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Fade into Fiction

OPINION: The Cinematic Connection

OPINION: The Cinematic Connection

Collectively I have seen hundreds of movies over the years. Every movie I have seen was unique, regardless of it being a prequel, sequel, or whatever the Fast and Furious series is. Objectively, every movie is different. I say this from a purely visual, auditory standpoint. There are movies that are “similar” but no one film is a complete carbon copy of any other film, no matter how big of a blockbuster summer thrill ride it may be. With these different movies comes different audience responses to them. For example, where one person finds disgust, one may find comedy or interest in that display of violence, deceit, etc. Film occupies a place similar to literature in that its perceived message is subjective in nature. The addition of a film’s visual and auditory component adds another layer to that subjective-ness. It always makes for an interesting delve into a film’s not so blatant displays of story devices and camera movements.

  Image via New York Post

Image via New York Post

 So, the film is presented to the audience and it is up to the audience to take whatever they want from it. There can be subtle hints or giveaways from the director planted there for keen viewers to see and explicate upon. While other facets of the film, but for the most part the messages being made, images, etc. are there for the audiences to pick up and to take and run with. The phrase “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” comes to mind. That “beauty” can be anything in a film whether it be something visually compelling, something implied, or something heard that makes it “beautiful” for an audience member. That “something” can be someone’s “everything” in a movie.

Everyone has a different facet that makes them connect with a film. But for myself, the way dialogue is delivered or the resolution of the plot is what makes a film for me most of the time. Hanging onto every word or gesture is what I enjoy looking for in a film. When I look at a film and think, “That instance made me hate/love this movie” these are the things I consider. It is interesting to think that a single moment can really spoil or payoff a film for an individual. There are several examples that come to mind when a movie truly makes or breaks it for myself, and to my friends’ dismay I can sometimes be annoying or snobby about it, but not on purpose. Sometimes I like parts of a film my friends did not like and vice versa. That is okay because that is that makes for discussion of said film. Being able to discuss a film is what I think a director, writer, and actor would want of an audience member’s viewing experience. When a person is able to discuss that is where ideas and knowledge can be shared and reciprocated. Regardless, there have been many movies that have affected me, and I would like to talk about that a little more.

  Image via The Atlantic

Image via The Atlantic

So, have you ever watched a movie so compelling that it moved with such an intense emotion towards it? There is at least one movie where this strong emotional response happens to anyone while viewing that “one movie.” Sometimes, the movie can move one to great tears, happiness, or even anger. I know I have experienced myriad of emotions when viewing a film. (Possible spoilers) One sort of recent film comes to mind and that is The Martian (2015) directed by Ridley Scott. There is a moment at the end of the film which depicts a truly uplifting triumph against insurmountable odds and it gets me every time. Matt Damon finally escapes Mars, overcoming crushing adversity, with the help of the team that left him originally marooned for years. The combination of the music, cinematography, even the dialogue is inspired and driven. There is a great sense of relief when he is rescued after surviving on the red alien world against all odds. There is also a great sense of camaraderie when the joining space agencies (NASA, United States and CNSA, China) work together to save one man. The film can be seen as celebrating humanity’s daring actions to gain a greater knowledge of the universe in which they reside in. When watching the film really watch it, take all the aspects of a film into consideration and if you can move slowly from one detail to another and ask yourself why. The director put all of these things there with a purpose and discovering those purposes is what can build a cinematic relationship to a specific film. Let the film “move” you, let it take its effect on you, coupled with your own personal feelings it can make for a greater understanding of the film medium and even your own personal feelings in a broader sense.

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